PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma)

 

Many patients are familiar with professional athletes to undergo PRP treatments in the off-season to recover from chronic where in tear injuries. Fortunately, costs have come down and can often be performed in the clinic or at the hospital. The process is rather simple, and nurse will draw your blood, spin it down in a centrifuge, then extract the platelets and inject them in your injury area. Platelets are known for clotting blood, but they also release powerful growth factors that play a role in healing. This is a similar concept as regenerative medicine with the stem cells.


Pain Radiating Into the Leg

Many patients will present with pain and/or numbness in the leg.  In many cases, the discomfort will be associated with back pain and move from the lumbar spine into the legs.  However, individuals may have pain isolated to the leg only.  In the majority of cases, the symptoms are secondary to an irritated or pinched nerve traveling from the spine into the leg. The nerves in the legs come from the low back or lumbar region.  If the individual has a bad disc, stenosis, or piriformis syndrome, the nerves that travel into the leg may become inflamed resulting in severe pain, numbness, or even weakness.

An MRI, CT, or EMG may be necessary to determine the exact source of pain.  Nonsurgical treatment options include, but are not limited to, trigger point injections, epidurals, selective nerve blocks, spinal cord stimulators, and physical therapy.


Thoracic Mid Back Pain

Pain in the middle of the back is often due to muscle strain. However, in some patients the symptoms may be related to a disc or joint. If a nerve in the mid back region becomes irritated, it can cause significant pain. Some individuals will describe radiation of the pain into the side of the chest and occasionally into the front chest wall.

Some patients will have pain in the mid back referred from the neck or lower back regions. Non-surgical treatment options include trigger point injections, epidurals, facet injections, selective nerve blocks, and physical therapy. An MRI or CT may be necessary to better determine the source of pain.


HIP PAIN

Pain in the hip is a common complaint that can be caused by a wide range of problems. Symptoms are frequently worse with prolonged walking and going from a sitting to standing position. The first issue is to determine if the hip comes from the hip joint (the ball and socket joint) or referred pain from the ‘lateral hip’ including muscles, ligaments, tendons and other soft tissues. Some patients even have lumbar or buttock pain that can refer pain to the hip or groin. Injuries including chronic bursitis involving the greater trochanter (the bony region on the side of your hip that causes pain if you lay on one side) or the ischial bursa (the ‘butt bone’). Labral tears, hip dislocations, and prior fractures are also possible causes.

In many patients, the pain is referred from the upper nerves from the lower back due to a pinched or inflamed nerve, bad disc, or joint inflammation. There are some nerves that can be compressed in the pelvis or the top of the thigh. An x-ray, MRI, ultrasound, NCS/EMG, or CT may be necessary to further evaluate the true source of pain.

If the pain is referred from the back, nonsurgical treatment options include trigger point injections, epidurals, selective nerve blocks, joint injections, and physical therapy. If the discomfort is secondary to a problem with the hip joint itself, nonsurgical treatment options include non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, compound transdermal medications, bracing, neuomodulation treatments, custom bracing, vitamin supplementation, cold therapy, initial corticosteroid injections, growth factor injections, cryopreserved stem cell injections, Botox therapy, and platelet rich plasma injections.


Neck Pain

Neck pain is extremely common and a frequent reason for visits to a doctor. It can occasionally occur secondary to an injury or trauma although most commonly presents without a specific cause. The pain could be secondary to a muscle strain, joint inflammation, or pinched nerve due to a bad disc. Pain can be isolated to the neck region itself. It can also radiate into the scalp and may be associated with headaches. Some patients will describe pain radiating into the shoulder blades and mid back area. If the nerve inflammation is significant, patients may experience pain, numbness, and even weakness in the arms and/or hands. Nonsurgical treatment options include, but are not limited to, trigger point injections, epidurals, facet injections, nerve blocks and physical therapy. An MRI, CT, or EMG may be necessary to better determine the source of pain and optimal treatment.